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Back to School

From this months' October issue of  Ladies Home Journal
I have this absurd fascination with Autumn. I think it's because when one lives in a climate with a hot summer, the yearning for cool weather comes to the forefront of our minds -- especially when, a few days before the first day of fall, it's 98 degrees!

We have seasons here in Sacramento too. Which makes this yearning so much harder.
know it's coming; I know the sweaters and boots and cool walks, the pumpkins and hot coffee are headed this way. It also reminds me of school. And I don't think that ever goes away. Though I've been out of college for years, I smell the autumnal air and it reminds me of going to class, happy for a new year, and ready to accomplish something important.

Or even better, school shopping with my kids makes me want to buy pencils and paper for myself.

So, I do.

And this is where the writing comes in because Autumn is a wonderful time for it. No more swimming pools, no ice cream or popsicles to divert one's attention (okay, the ice cream will always be a diversion --always). But, it's the "back to school" agenda that gets me, and needs to get me. And by golly, I'm going to get "Back to School' with my writing, and so can you.

Here's a couple of contests to enter to get your creative juices going:

1. Are you a children's book writer? Get a picture book published! Great contest, for newbies and pros alike. If you win, you'll have your story published and illustrated online by a real publisher. And who doesn't want that for their resume? It's a great foot in the door.

Check out MeeGenius for more details. Contest ends November 1st.

2. Like to write non-fiction? Ladies Home Journal has a personal essay contest going on right now. All you have to write about is an aspect of personal growth in your life -- very broad, yet very good because you can write about anything -- and have a chance at having it published in their magazine and win $3,000 too!

Check out Ladies Home Journal for more details. Contest ends December 13th.

Okay, grab a hot cider, crank up the proverbial fire place and get going on writing for your "Back to school" season. School is in!

Comments

  1. I know how you feel Heather. I used to live near Sacramento and remember the HEAT. Now I love fall even more with the rich colors of orange and burgundy in the Blue Ridge of VA. Hope you and your family have a wonderful fall and hope your temps change soon. ; )

    ReplyDelete
  2. You understand! Thank you for your words. Looking forward to the fall...enjoy your fall now! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love Fall, too.

    Children's books ... I atually have an idea for a series of books for children. It is based ona a family of animals and teaches biblical principles of obeying parents, being friends, functioning as sibilngs, etc. I've looked at a training course but it is about $700, and that is out of the question right now. I'm interested in learning more about this genre of writing.

    Have your written any children's books? What has your experience been with that? Thanks for this post. wb

    ReplyDelete

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