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V is for Vacillating

The definition, according to Webster, of vacillating: to sway to and fro: to waver, totter, stagger.

Such a strange word. Yet, I do this all the time.

I vacillate between writing a middle grade book, or literary fiction.

I vacillate between excercising, or sitting down to watch something on the TV.

I vacillate between a warm sour-cream laden burrito for lunch, or yogurt and fruit.

I vacillate between a lot of different things, and usually, it's because my wants are trying to overpower my true needs.

Though, I don't know how I account for the writing thing ... I vacillate on writing a lot of different styles, mostly because I like so many-- from young adult to fantasy -- and to see if I can write in a particular style that I'm not used to. Well, that's the reason I'm coming up with, anyway.

What about you? What do you "stagger" and "totter" over? Facebook or actual writing? Folding laundry or eating chocolate?

And really, have you ever used this word in your vocabulary? Or in any of your writing? If not, you should.

It's a great word to vacillate over using in your next story.

Comments

  1. i use it in language, but may have not used it yet in writing--good v word

    ReplyDelete

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